• "If we go down that road, we’re headed toward a society that’s run on the basis of mass imprisonment. And that’s not just about making the prisons bigger and fuller, making them engines for making money for private corporations, but it’s also about turning your schools into prisons, and turning your streets into prisons, and turning your community into something that’s much more like a prison. And we do not want that society based on mass imprisonment. That’s not our future. We are not Americans, we are not Americans."


    riots  
    prison  

    3 years ago
  • "When we feel the impact of our poverty of the imagination, we reach for what we think is the future, and that’s always the United States of America."


    silava  
    riots  

    3 years ago
  • "The difference between 1981 and now is that the relationship between information and power has been changed, and our tactics for understanding our defence of our communities have to take those changes into account. And that means that we have to think very carefully about how we engage with the media. I’m very happy that there are people here who are independent distributors of information and news, who are circulating what goes on here and circulating interpretations of what’s happened in this country. We have to get it to people outside of our country—we have to internationalize it. We have to think about how technology can work for us. And media is not something transparent."


    media  
    race  
    riots  

    3 years ago
  • "When you look at the layer of political leaders from our communities, the generation who came of age during that time thirty years ago, many of those people have accepted the logic of privatization. They’ve privatized that movement, and they’ve sold their services as consultants and managers and diversity trainers. They’ve sold their services to the police, they’ve sold them to the army, they’ve sold them to the corporate world…go to some of their websites and you’ll see how proud they are of their clients. And that means that, in many areas, the loss of experience, the loss of the imagination is a massive phenomenon. So that the young people in the courts today don’t have a defence campaign. They don’t have one yet, but I hope that one will develop."


    london  
    race  
    riots  

    3 years ago
  • "move beyond race and towards violence"


    silva  

    3 years ago
  • "I think marriage in general is not a healthy institution in our society. If people want civil rights, then that’s what I feel we should be fighting for. Couples, people who are each other’s kin or primary intimacies, a friend who takes care of a friend for 30 years in the same household—all should have basic civil rights. To bring that whole movement for social justice under the rubric of ‘gay marriage’ seems to me just to reinforce patriarchal notions of who is worthy of care and support. It also lets down the gay people who don’t want to be married.
    The movement for gay marriage has had a strong push among very class-privileged people, because they are the people with trusts and with property and with health care. If you’re gay, black, poor and you don’t have any access to insurance, the question of whether your partner can be included on your insurance is not just relevant to the health needs of your life. What would be more relevant is national health care!"

    bell hooks (via queeraspie)

    (via manif3stlove)


    lgbtq  

    3 years ago
  • "I am thinking, as I write, of my young, black, poor, single mother of four who raised me and my three younger sisters, amidst intimate partner violence, alone in the city of Camden during its media heyday in the 80s—the days of looming welfare reform—in one of the most “dangerous” and economically distressed cities in the country. My mother—not unlike other poor black and brown women in Camden, Trenton, Paterson, Newark and elsewhere—was imagined as the amoral, non-married, capital-sucking, welfare queen who raised children alone, without a man/head of the household. I am certain that the “institution” of marriage as conjured in the national imaginary, in all its moral splendor, did more to instantiate my mother’s presumed inferiority than the possibility of difference. And, that ain’t representative of a feminist, left, or radical queer politic even though “mothering [with or without a man or woman] is the most feminist act of all” as beautifully articulated by Alexis Pauline Gumbs. But, I digress…though, not really."


    lgbtq  

    3 years ago
  • "That’s what I see missing in our discussions today about race, gender, class, sexual preference. We talk a lot of stuff about openness and plurality and diversity and so on, but what’s the practice? What is the actual practice between one subject and another, between one leftist and another? There are troubling conclusions you have to draw about the generation of the ’60s and its actual practices, what we actually do when we get home or when the television cameras are not there. You can’t believe that Clinton ought to come out more strongly for children’s rights, one asserts out of his mouth if you don’t take care of your own children. Women should have access or rights, but you don’t treat your women colleagues very well, the women around you, and the same relating to men. What’s the practice? The question is: Is there a place in theory today for us to to be critical of various gaps or lapses or aporias in the theoretical?"


    gender  
    theory  

    3 years ago
  • "The psychoanalytic might in fact offer a way to remain critical, and to secularize that value that had its center in the religious, in religiosity. Perhaps the psychoanalytic is a strategy or a mechanism for finding some dimension of self-criticism that one needs when the stakes are now : recognition, affluence, degrees of access and accessibility, when it is no longer about literacy because we are talking about people who’ve crossed a frontier in that regard. When you talk about the learned classes of African-Americans today, you’re talking about people who have a whole different set of needs. How do those people behave? And what I’m suggesting is that we’re not behaving in ways that I would consider exemplary. That’s what I’m trying to find a discourse to talk about because it’s larger than me; it’s bigger than a generation and it’s not just my being unhappy and complaining. This really has to do with resources, who has access to them, how access is granted, how that whole question of access is configured, by whom, to whose benefit."

    What do you think about psychoanalysis?

    (Source: blackculturalstudies.org)



    3 years ago